Meet the Teachers

We’re proud to introduce a really fantastic line up of presenters and teachers at this year’s event!


Ann Eunson

Ann Eunson has lived in Shetland all her life and wouldn’t want to be anywhere else. What she loves about these Isles is its rich knitting and musical heritage. Her mother, who was a great lace knitter, taught Ann and her sisters to knit at a very early age. Ann has experimented with all types of knitting over the years but her passion is fine Shetland lace. It never fails to amaze her how you can achieve such intricate patterns with just a few simple stitches, it is much easier to knit than it looks.

 

 

Anna Maltz

Anna Maltz is an avid sweaterspotter and knit detective who sees the world through yarn-tinted spectacles. She is an independent knitting pattern designer with a background in Fine Art. She writes a regular column (and occasional pattern) for Pom Pom Magazine. She has published two books, Penguin: A Knit Collection, and Marlisle: A New Direction in Knitting, as well as contributing to other publications such as A Stash of One’s Own, complied by Clara Parkes and Making Magazine. She lives in London and teachers all over the world.

More information about Anna can found at www.annamaltz.com

 

 

Chrissie Day

Chrissie Day works as a knitwear designer and mixed fiber artist and has had 11 books published. She has designed for companies as far afield as Australia and also private commissions abroad, taught in Europe and Scandinavia as well as magazine commissions work, including most of the major UK magazines.

Chrissie Day also designs for companies to promote their yarns in books and magazines, and teach knitting privately.

More information about Chrissie can be found at www.chrissieday.co.uk

 

 

Christel Seyfarth, Denmark

Christel Seyfarth is born on the westernmost island of Denmark, Fanø. She is an islander of heart, and she thrives and is inspired by the sandy beaches and the North Sea on Fanø.

Today she works as a knitwear designer and organizer of Fanø International Knit Festival and Loch Ness Knit Festival.  Christel runs a lovely shop on Fanø and she sells her colourful designs world-wide. Christel’s outstanding designs is known all over the world for her colourful pattern and colour mix.

 

 

 

Elizabeth Johnston

Shetland spinner and knitter.  She learned much of her craft as a child, observing and learning from family and friends.

She uses these age old skills, handed down through generations, to turn Shetland fleece into beautiful soft yarns, and knitted Fair Isle and lace items in her business, Shetland Handspun.

She teaches workshops in spinning, knitting, and is the author of two chapters in Shetland Textiles 800 BC to the Present, and co-authored The Warp Weighted Loom with friends from Iceland and Norway.

 

 

Ethel Hillier

A child of the Northeast of Scotland, and grew up with knitting needles in her hands, as we all did.

As a working girl and mother, in India and Dorset, knitting took a back seat. When Ethel retired 7 years ago, she rekindled her love of knitting firstly with Shetland lace.

She soon discovered the beauty of Estonian lace and the history behind it… and so her story goes on.

 

 

Hazel Tindall

Learnt to knit before she could read and write, and has no memory of learning to knit. As a child she was surrounded by knitters who had to knit quickly and to a high standard as they needed to sell their knitwear to supplement the family income.

Hazel particularly loves knitting Fair Isle, knitting her own designs. She now writes knitting patterns for other knitters to follow.

Hazel is a regular instructor at Shetland Wool Week and has led classes for Edinburgh Yarn Festival, Dornoch Fibre Fest, Craft Cruises, Arena Travel, Celtic Journeys, Loch Ness Knit Fest, Joyce James Tours and others. She has made two instructional films – good alternatives for those who can’t get to workshops. More information about Hazel can be found at www.hazeltindall.com.

 

Kurt Payne

New Zealand based hand and machine knitter, hand-spinner and weaver currently studying to become a TKGA Master Knitter and technical editor.
With a background in commercial apparel, Kurt loves to teach design techniques to experienced knitters as well as helping newer knitters build confidence.
Collaborating both locally and internationally is another of his passions with designs featuring in magazines and exhibitions, some even award winning!

www.instagram.com/manknitea

 

 

 

Laura West

Professional, award-winning bookbinder Laura West has taught thousands of people how to ‘make a book.’ Her workshops are organised, enlightening and fun – everyone learns a new skill. Working with professional knitters she has designed a project to make a book/folder which can be kept with one’s current project.

This workbook can be made quickly and learned during a morning workshop. No experience is necessary, but those with good hand skills (Hello, makers!) will achieve great results AND come away with a really useful object which will help organise their own work. Ideal for designers, once the current project is finished, all the inserts and patterns can quickly be archived in a normal folder, since opened out these items are based on A4 size. Professional knitters and makers can design and print their own ‘project forms’ to suit their own working methods and required information.

More information about Laura can be found at www.laurawest.com

 

Maddie Harvey

Freelance designer and knitting teacher, living and working in Edinburgh, UK. She loves bold and simple knitwear designs, especially those that use stripes and lace patterning in striking colour combinations. A former primary school teacher, Maddie is inspired by colour, geometry and knitwear construction.

Find out more at maddieharveydesigns.com or find Maddie on Instagram and Twitter as @harveyknits

 

 

Tania Ashton Jones

www.tjfrog.co.uk

Tania Ashton Jones is a Dorset Button Maker, a hand knitter and teacher.  Brought up in Dorset, and now living on the Isle of Skye, Tania’s creative business, TJFrog, aims to contribute to keeping alive the traditional skill of the handmade Dorset Button, a cottage industry dating back to the 1600s, which collapsed after the introduction of the electronic button making machine in 1851.  Tania makes buttons and various accessories using Dorset Buttony techniques.  She loves sourcing a variety of different yarns and choosing a design to best showcase the nature of the yarn.

More information about Tania can be found at www.tjfrog.co.uk