Q&A with Kyle Kunnecke 

We’ve been speaking to another Loch Ness Knit Fest tutor and San Francisco designer, Kyle Kunnecke. Surrounded by spinning wheels, looms, dyeing equipment, and fiber, he does his best to interpret his experiences into work that piques curiosity, educates and inspires. This will be Kyle’s first journey to Scotland so we look forward to giving him a true Highland welcome at Loch Ness Knit Fest 2017!

Kyle has been intrigued in crafts since the age of 4…
“My earliest memory is actually of crochet. I remember sitting on the sofa with my mother and watching her pull thread through loop with a tiny hook. I was mesmerized by the transformation of string into fabric. Memories of her patient crafting inspire me to this day”.

He believes that the arts have the power to heal, and that when we share our story with others, the world becomes a better place.
“I love knitting for many reasons. The friendship and community that it invites me into; the creativity and possibilities that come with yarn and needles; the opportunity to solve problems, create, design, and make… Knitting is healing, and also allows the chance for us to do something for others”. 

Here’s some insight into his favourite fibers…
“I prefer natural fibers, and am most interested in rare wools. Also I love tweeds and can’t wait to explore the yarns of Scotland”.

So who’s his inspiration…
“I am drawn to classic designers, people who work in color, and cultures that use fiber arts in their traditions and ceremonies. I admire the work of Kaffe Fassett, Mary Jane Mucklestone, and Kieran Foley“.

So what’s Kyle looking forward to the most at this year’s festival…
“I am really looking forward to meeting the participants of the event. In my travels I have learned so much from my students and know that this will be an incredible experience. Of all the classes I get to bring to Scotland, I am particularly excited to share the story of the Navajo Churro. This rare breed sheep is only found in North America; brought here from Spain in the 15th Century. I’m bringing kits of naturally colored yarn to the event, so this is also an opportunity for my students to work with wool from one of the oldest domesticated sheep breeds in North America; a breed that almost went extinct”.

If you have a spare second, check out the workshops Kyle’s taking during the festival, all details are listed in the programme.